F1 technology adapted to CV90

In a world first, tracked military vehicles are being upgraded with technology adapted from Formula One to improve handling and speed across the battlefield. The Stridsfordon 90 (Strf 90; Eng. Combat Vehicle 90, CV90) is a family of Swedish tracked combat vehicles designed by FMV, Hägglunds and Bofors during the mid-1980s and early 1990s. The Swedish version of the main infantry fighting vehicle is fitted with a turret from Bofors that is equipped with a 40 mm autocannon, although export versions use 30 mm and 35 mm autocannons. Developed specifically for the Nordic sub-arctic climate, it has very good mobility in snow and wetlands while carrying and supporting eight (later versions were reduced to six) fully equipped soldiers. Other variants include Forward Observation, Command and Control, Anti-air, Armoured Recovery, Electronic Warfare and so forth. It is still produced and being developed by BAE Systems Hägglunds AB.
The CV90 Mk0 is powered by a DSI14 engine developed by Scania, which provides 550 horse power (HP) and it can reach speeds of 70 kilometres (43 mi) per hour. The basic CV90 has a maximum road range of 320 kilometres (200 mi), but the latest generation can reach up to 600 kilometres (370 mi). The CV90 offers quieter movement for improved stealth, greater speed over good terrain, and higher ground clearance for protection against mines and improvised explosive devices.
BAE Systems is considering upgrading the CV90 with a hybrid-electric propulsion system as armies look to cut fuel expenses, due to environmental issues and fuel economy. A hybrid-electric drive could cut fuel consumption by 10 to 30 percent. The new system would also provide a power boost to move the vehicle. The hybrid-electric combines a standard diesel engine with a battery pack to provide extra power to propel the vehicle or provide additional electricity.
In April 2015, BAE Systems fitted a CV90 with an active damping suspension system derived from Formula One racing cars. This technology calculates the vehicle’s speed and anticipates the terrain ahead, then pressurizes the suspension at independent points to lift the chassis and keep the vehicle level. The suspension, which had been modified to suit a 38-ton armored vehicle rather than the 700 kg (1,500 lb) racing car, reportedly increases speed by 30-40 percent on rough terrain, outrunning main battle tanks, decreases vehicle pitch acceleration by 40 percent, gives greater maneuverability and stability for on-the-move gunnery, and reduces crew fatigue and life-cycle costs.

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